Origin of the Republican Elephant

The Republican Party
Origin of the Republican Elephant

 
This symbol of the party was born in the imagination of cartoonist Thomas Nast and first appeared in Harper’s Weekly on Nov. 7, 1874. An 1860 issue of Railsplitter and an 1872 cartoon in Harper’s Weekly connected elephants with Republicans, but it was Nast who provided the party with its symbol.

Oddly, two unconnected events led to the birth of the Republican Elephant. James Gordon Bennett’s New York Herald raised the cry of “Caesarism” in connection with the possibility of a third term try for President Ulysses S. Grant. The issue was taken up by the Democratic politicians in 1874, halfway through Grant’s second term and just before the midterm elections, and helped disaffect Republican voters.

While the illustrated journals were depicting Grant wearing a crown, the Herald involved itself in another circulation-builder in an entirely different, nonpolitical area. This was the Central Park Menagerie Scare of 1874, a delightful hoax perpetrated by the Herald. They ran a story, totally untrue, that the animals in the zoo had broken loose and were roaming the wilds of New York’s Central Park in search of prey.

Cartoonist Thomas Nast took the two examples of the Herald enterprise and put them together in a cartoon for Harper’s Weekly. He showed an ass (symbolizing the Herald) wearing a lion’s skin (the scary prospect of Caesarism) frightening away the animals in the forest (Central Park). The caption quoted a familiar fable: “An ass having put on a lion’s skin roamed about in the forest and amused himself by frightening all the foolish animals he met within his wanderings.”

One of the foolish animals in the cartoon was an elephant, representing the Republican vote – not the party, the Republican vote – which was being frightened away from its normal ties by the phony scare of Caesarism. In a subsequent cartoon on Nov. 21, 1874, after the election in which the Republicans did badly, Nast followed up the idea by showing the elephant in a trap, illustrating the way the Republican vote had been decoyed from its normal allegiance.

Other cartoonists picked up the symbol, and the elephant soon ceased to be the vote and became the party itself: the jackass, now referred to as the donkey, made a natural transition from representing the Herald to representing the Democratic party that had frightened the elephant.

 

From William Safire’s “New Language of Politics,” Revised edition, Collier Books, New York, 1972

I am a Republican because. . . (Republican Principles)

The Republican Party
Republican Principles

I am a Republican because:

I believe the strength of our nation lies with the individual and that each person’s dignity, freedom, ability and responsibility must be honored.

I believe in equal rights, equal justice and equal opportunity for all, regardless of race, creed, sex, age or disability.

I believe that free enterprise and the encouragement of individual initiative have brought this nation opportunity, economic growth and prosperity.

I believe government must practice fiscal responsibility and allow individuals to keep more of the money they earn.

I believe the proper role of government is to provide for the people only those critical functions that cannot be performed by individuals or private organizations and that the best government is that which governs least.

I believe the most effective, responsible and responsive government is government closest to the people.

I believe Americans must retain the principles that have made us strong while developing new and innovative ideas to meet the challenges of changing times.

I believe Americans value and should preserve our national strength and pride while working to extend peace, freedom and human rights throughout the world.

Finally, I believe the Republican Party is the best vehicle for translating these ideals into positive and successful principles of government. 

Source: The Republican National Committee

The Republican Oath

The Republican Party
Republican Oath

I believe that the proper function of government is to do for the people those things that have to be done but cannot be done, or cannot be done as well by individuals, and that the most effective government is government closest to the people.

I believe that good government is based on the individual and that each person’s ability, dignity, freedom and responsibility must be honored and recognized.

I believe that free enterprise and the encouragement of individual initiative and incentive have given this nation an economic system second to none.

I believe that sound money policy should be our goal.

I believe in equal rights, equal justice and equal opportunity for all, regardless of race, creed, age, sex or national origin. I believe that persons with disabilities should be afforded equal rights, equal justice and equal opportunity as well.

I believe we must retain those principles worth retaining, yet always be receptive to new ideas with an outlook broad enough to accommodate thoughtful change and varying points of view.

I believe that Americans value and should preserve their feeling of national strength and pride, and at the same time share with people everywhere a desire for peace and freedom and the extension of human rights throughout the world.

Finally, I believe that the Republican Party is the best vehicle for translating these ideals into positive and successful principles of government.

Source: The Republican National Committee

The Republican Party / Origin of ‘GOP’

The Republican Party
Origin of ‘GOP’

A favorite of headline writers, GOP dates back to the 1870s and ’80s. The abbreviation was cited in a New York Herald story on Oct. 15, 1884; “‘ The G.O.P. Doomed,’ shouted the Boston Post…. The Grand Old Party is in condition to inquire….”

But what GOP stands for has changed with the times. In 1875 there was a citation in the Congressional Record referring to “this gallant old party,” and, according to Harper’s Weekly, in the Cincinnati Commercial in 1876 to “Grand Old Party.”

Perhaps the use of “the G.O.M.” for Britain’s Prime Minister William E. Gladstone in 1882 as ” the Grand Old Man” stimulated the use of GOP in the United States soon after.

In early motorcar days, GOP took on the term “get out and push.” During the 1964 presidential campaign, “Go-Party” was used briefly, and during the Nixon Administration, frequent references to the “generation of peace” had happy overtones. In line with moves in the ’70s to modernize the party, Republican leaders took to referring to the “grand old party,” harkening back to a 1971 speech by President Nixon at the dedication of the Eisenhower Republican Center in Washington, D.C.

Indeed, the “grand old party” is an ironic term, since the Democrat Party was organized some 22 years earlier in 1832.

Source: The Republican National Committee

gop elephant 3

Suffering indignities from the party I embraced 25 years ago by Star Parker

Jewish World Review May 27, 2013/ 18 Sivan, 5773 Suffering indignities from the party I embraced 25 years ago By Star Parker

JewishWorldReview.com | Some 25 years ago, I changed my life.

Star Parker Corn RowA visit inside a church opened my eyes to the destructive life I was living, financed by welfare checks generously provided by American taxpayers.

I got off welfare, went to work, got politically active and became a Republican. I didn’t become a Republican because of what the party looked like. I became a Republican because of what the party stood for: individual freedom, traditional values, with a view that government’s role is to protect our freedom at home and abroad.

For the next 25 years, I had to suffer indignities from liberals who could not fathom that a black could be a Republican because she actually embraced these values.

But now, we have a strange turn of events.

Liberals no longer feel on the run like they did in the 1980s and 1990s. They are running the show and they know it. So I hear less from them.

Now the indignities come from inside the party that I embraced 25 years ago.

It was always the Democrats that were about interest group politics.

Now Republicans have somehow concluded that their party’s woes are because it once stood for something. So the game plan is to morph into the Democrats’ stepsister.

Whereas once Republican buzzwords were family and freedom, now it is inclusion. The marching orders, according to the post-election “autopsy” report from the Republican National Committee, is outreach to blacks, Hispanics, gays, women and Asians. It’s now about what the party looks like, not what it stands for.

Christian conservatives, once the answer, are now the problem.

Which gets to Bishop E. W. Jackson.

Bishop Jackson is an outspoken black Christian conservative with a law degree from Harvard. He also was just selected as the nominee for lieutenant governor of Virginia.

Although Republicans are talking about black outreach, it is not, unfortunately, blacks like Jackson that they have in mind.

He is outspoken about limited government and personal freedom, about the importance of family and traditional marriage, and about doing something about the scourge of abortion.

In other words, E.W. Jackson stands for everything that the Republican Party once stood for.

He’s making the Republicans of inclusion squirm.

The current Republican lieutenant governor of Virginia, Bill Bolling, immediately criticized his party for nominating Jackson, saying it will feed the “image of extremism” in the party.

Ronald Reagan used to say that the 11th commandment was to not speak ill of a fellow Republican. That commandment has now been modified to permit it, if that fellow Republican is a Christian conservative.

Certainly, Jackson does not pull punches. But his statements about the government “plantation” are 100 percent true. It’s no accident that trillions of dollars in government programs have had zero impact on black poverty. Black single-parent homes and out-of-wedlock births have tripled since the War on Poverty began in 1965.

A new Gallup poll shows a dramatic shift in American attitudes on traditional morality. Fifty-nine percent now say homosexual relations are acceptable, up 19 points from 2001; 60 percent say out-of-wedlock birth is OK, up 15 points from 2001; 68 percent say divorce is OK, up 9 points from 2001; and 14 percent are OK with polygamy, twice that of 2001.

The economy is sputtering at 2 percent growth, four points below the expected recovery growth rate from a deep recession, and our national debt is now greater than our gross domestic product.

The country needs a bold alternative voice to wake it up. The conservative Ken Cuccinelli-E W Jackson ticket in Virginia is such a voice.

Will their party get behind them or pull the rug out, as it has done to other conservatives in recent races? Will the Republican Party get back to what it once was about, or will it become just another symptom of a nation in decline?